Acoustics

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Welcome!

Acoustics

Thanks for your interest in ACOUSTICS –
a clinical study looking at the effects of an investigational medication in 12 to 17 year olds with asthma who are having trouble controlling their condition with their current medication.

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This website will tell you a little about the study and clinical studies in general. It will also help you find out if you can take part in ACOUSTICS. If you have any questions, please ask your parent to contact the study team – we’ll be happy to discuss the study with them in more detail.

Welcome!

Acoustics

Thanks for your interest in ACOUSTICS –
a clinical study looking at the effects of an investigational medication in 12 to 17 year olds with asthma who are having trouble controlling their condition with their current medication.

What is asthma?

What is asthma?

Asthma is a chronic disease affecting the tubes that carry air in and out of sufferers' lungs (their airways).

What is an asthma attack?

An asthma attack occurs when a person's airways narrow due to a trigger (e.g. pollen) or an external event (e.g. physical exercise). This narrowing is caused by the muscles of their airway becoming tightened and inflamed. Sticky mucus can also be produced and block these airways even more. All this makes it very difficult to breathe properly during an asthma attack.

What triggers asthma?

A huge range of things can trigger asthma attacks from furry animals and dust mites to physical activity and pollution. Laughing too hard or eating certain foods can even trigger some people's asthma attacks! If you're unsure what triggers your asthma try keeping an asthma diary listing:

  • When you had an asthma attack
  • What the weather was like that day
  • What you were doing at the time
  • Where you were
  • What you ate before the attack

Knowing your triggers is easy.

Fighting your asthma is not.

That's why we're conducting the ACOUSTICS clinical study. If you'd like to know if you can take part please ask your parent(s) or legal guardian(s) to fill out this form.

Top tips for tackling asthma triggers

  1. Dust mites: It's not fun tidying your bedroom, but dust mites love mess! So make sure your sheets are washed regularly and your carpets hoovered to help get rid of those little nasties.
  2. Mold: Mold is gross, isn't it? But more than that, for some people, mold actually triggers their asthma! If this sounds like you, remove sources of damp like houseplants - mold loves moisture!
  3. Physical activity: Think if you have asthma, you can't exercise? Wrong! In actual fact exercise might even help your condition. Short sessions work best. And try to avoid exercising outdoors in really cold weather. Talk to your physician for more information.
  4. Pollen: Avoiding pollen can be tricky, but it can be done! When levels are high, for example, try not to play outdoors and keep the windows closed.
  5. Pets: If your asthma is triggered by pets, there are some things you can do to help reduce the chance of an attack. For example, as much as we know you want to, don't hug and kiss your pet! Having someone else wash and brush your dog or cat every week can help too!

What is a clinical study?

Without clinical studies, there would be no new medications. That’s because they are vital scientific investigations that help us find new medications or new uses for medications that are already in use; every year, many people of all ages take part in such studies.

We’re conducting the ACOUSTICS study because, although numerous treatment options for asthma exist, some people still suffer from uncontrolled asthma. Find out more.

Acoustics Study?

What is the ACOUSTICS study?

We’re conducting the ACOUSTICS (Adolescents with UnCOntrolled ASThma on Inhaled CorticoSteroids) study because, although numerous treatment options for asthma exist, some people still suffer from uncontrolled asthma.

The investigational medication we’re looking at targets a particular compound in your body.

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What will happen during the study?

If you join, you’d be on the study for up to two and a half years depending on how you respond to the study medication:

  • For 52 weeks, you’d take the investigational medication or a placebo (an inactive substance that has no medicine in it) plus your standard asthma treatment
  • For the next 24 or 52 weeks, you’d take the investigational medication plus your standard asthma treatment
  • During the final 20 weeks, you would receive your standard asthma treatment only

The investigational medication and the placebo are given as injections under the skin every 4 weeks during a clinic visit. We’ll offer to numb the area first to make this more comfortable.

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What will happen between visits?

Because we’d need to know how the study drug was affecting your lungs and general health, you’d also need to:

  • Monitor your peak flow each morning using a handheld device
  • Answer questions about your condition and medication use using an eDiary

The study team will show you how to use these devices. Because this is such an important part of the study, if you feel you couldn’t do this, you should not join the study.

What will the clinic visits involve?

Participants will visit a study clinic approximately every 4 weeks. This would allow us to give you the study medication and monitor your health using assessments such as physical examinations, lung function tests and blood tests. These study assessments are provided at no cost.

What is a placebo?

A placebo is an inactive substance (with no medicine in it) that will help us be sure that any effects seen are caused by the study medication and nothing else. You wouldn’t know whether you were receiving active study drug or placebo (neither would the study team). Everyone will continue on their background medication and have the same tests and procedures during the study.

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Can I take part?

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What is asthma?

Asthma is a chronic disease affecting the tubes that carry air in and out of sufferers' lungs (their airways).

What is an asthma attack?

An asthma attack occurs when a person's airways narrow due to a trigger (e.g. pollen) or an external event (e.g. physical exercise). This narrowing is caused by the muscles of their airway becoming tightened and inflamed. Sticky mucus can also be produced and block these airways even more. All this makes it very difficult to breathe properly during an asthma attack.

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What triggers asthma?

A huge range of things can trigger asthma attacks from furry animals and dust mites to physical activity and pollution. Laughing too hard or eating certain foods can even trigger some people's asthma attacks! If you're unsure what triggers your asthma try keeping an asthma diary listing:

  • When you had an asthma attack
  • What the weather was like that day
  • What you were doing at the time
  • Where you were
  • What you ate before the attack

Knowing your triggers is easy.

Fighting your asthma is not.

That's why we're conducting the ACOUSTICS clinical study. If you'd like to know if you can take part please ask your parent(s) or legal guardian(s) to fill out this form.

Top tips for tackling asthma triggers

  1. Dust mites: It's not fun tidying your bedroom, but dust mites love mess! So make sure your sheets are washed regularly and your carpets hoovered to help get rid of those little nasties.
  2. Mold: Mold is gross, isn't it? But more than that, for some people, mold actually triggers their asthma! If this sounds like you, remove sources of damp like houseplants - mold loves moisture!
  3. Physical activity: Think if you have asthma, you can't exercise? Wrong! In actual fact exercise might even help your condition. Short sessions work best. And try to avoid exercising outdoors in really cold weather. Talk to your physician for more information.
  4. Pollen: Avoiding pollen can be tricky, but it can be done! When levels are high, for example, try not to play outdoors and keep the windows closed.
  5. Pets: If your asthma is triggered by pets, there are some things you can do to help reduce the chance of an attack. For example, as much as we know you want to, don't hug and kiss your pet! Having someone else wash and brush your dog or cat every week can help too!
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